Design Well, Get Well: Using Design to Improve Health

 

Design Well, Get Well: Using Design to Improve Health

We all understand that advanced research and scientific breakthroughs are driving healthcare innovation, but how often do we consider the role of design in this process? During DESIGN WEEK RI industry experts and local innovators will help us think about how design can impact health.

The Featured Speaker series includes two rock stars in the Rhode Island design community who are both using product development to improve health: Aidan Petrie (a 2014 Rhode Island Design Hall of Fame inductee) and Hannah Chung. Aidan is Chief Innovation Officer at Ximedica, a Rhode Island company improving consumer healthcare through the development of thoughtful, design-centric medical devices. Hannah is Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of Sproutel, whose product, Jerry the Bear, is using play-based education to teach children to manage their own health. On Tuesday, September 22, they will present a talk on “Better Health By Design” at the RISD Auditorium.

The Eat and Speak Luncheon series continues on Wednesday, September 23 with n|e|m|d architects, a Providence-based firm that has completed projects in major medical centers like Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Women and Infants Hospital. They will host a lunchtime session on “Evidence Based Design in Healthcare,” examining how design principals can promote healing, relieve patient anxiety, and reduce medical errors and infection.

DESIGN WEEK RI concludes with the internationally-renowned, student led Better World By Design conference (September 25-27). This year’s conference is focused on using design across all disciplines to create a society that is more accessible and inclusive. Speakers include Gavin Atkinson, Design Engineer at US BioDesign, a maker of custom biomedical textiles used in healthcare procedures and implantable medical devices.

Indeed, design can help us create a better world in so many areas of our lives, and our health is no exception.